Dunnville Horticulture Society

What’s on your garden wish list?

What’s on your garden wish list this year?

Every year we are overwhelmed with new plants to choose from for our gardens. With the changes in climate, our plant choices are changing as well.

Using eco-friendly plants such as indigenous, pollinator-friendly and drought tolerant is the new norm for many gardeners. Supporting the environment and food production also seem to be the trend for today’s gardens.

The Hosta of the year for 2019 is the Lakeside Paisley Print, while the 2019 perennial of the year is Stachys Monieri Hummelo, a clump-forming cousin to lamb’s ear that attracts bees.

Sweet potato vines, which now come in many different colours, can be coupled with tropical plants for containers, making for a striking display.

And monochromatic gardens using variations of a single colour, usually white, seem to be on the rise.

Using plants in a variety of containers, such as shoes, purses, lampshades or birdcages are unique ways to display our favourite flowers.

Let your creative juices flow as you artistically design your garden this spring.

Why not join other happy gardeners and would-be gardeners at our next program night on June 20? Our speaker will be Loretta Shields, sharing on the topic of backyard birds.

The Dunnville Hort Society meets every third Thursday at the Optimist Club Hall, 101 Main St. from 7 to 9 p.m., or visit us online at our Facebook page or website www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org. 

- Marlene Link is a member of the Dunnville Horticultural Society.

Let Someone else do the Work of Downsizing Your Garden

Planting season is fast approaching, and plant sales are a great way to bring some new additions to your garden. - Julia Lovett/Metroland

Moving? Downsizing? Are you unable to care for your garden due to lack of time or getting older? Well this might be a solution to your problem: Have a BYOS (bring your own shovel) yard sale.

Let others do the digging and dividing and you keep just a small division for your own downsized garden.

Check with your local horticulture clubs to see when they are having their annual plant sale to raise money for their garden projects in the community.

Our own Dunnville Horticulture Society plant sale is coming up on May 11, so you can start planning your plant donations. Just make sure they are potted well in advance and labelled.

I’m sure the members would like to add a few new plants to their gardens as well. You might be surprised at how many of your neighbours show up with shovels in hand, having watched your garden flourish from a distance.

And because others are doing the work for you, you could always put up a sign saying, “Free plants.”

Also, why not join other gardeners and would-be gardeners at our next program night on May 16?

Our special speaker will be Adam Koziel of Earthgen, sharing his expertise on growing truffles in Haldimand. This is an exciting and emerging foray in agriculture in our area, so you won’t want to miss it.

The Dunnville Horticultural Society meets every third Thursday at the Optimist Club Hall, 101 Main St. from 7 to 9 p.m.

Visit us any time online at our Facebook page or at www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org

For questions or comments, contact president Deb Zynomirski at 416-566-9337 or debzyn@gmail.com.

 

- Marlene Link is a member of the Dunnville Horticultural Society.

Controlled Burn Completed in Dunnville

Dan McKay’s prediction is that the tall grass in the Thompson Creek Parkland will start to grow immediately now that the controlled burn on the site has taken place.

“We’ve been wanting to do this burn for many years,” he said.

McKay is the project co-ordinator on the Dunnville parkland restoration project, working in conjunction with a number of other partners, including Haldimand County, the Dunnville Horticultural Society and Ducks Unlimited Canada.

“Controlled burns remove unwanted, invasive species and dead thatches that have accumulated over the past 20 years,” he said.

While there have been a few accidental spot fires over the years, the fire on April 25 was the first controlled burn on the site in decades.

Lands and Forests Consulting was contracted to do the burn, with Haldimand County Emergency Services being consulted and firefighters from Dunnville and Hagersville stations on standby.

“We had to do a few modifications, but we kept the burn within the boundaries,” said Jason Sickel, the burn boss on site. “We had to account for a late wind shift.”

Now that the burn has been done, a 20-acre plot of native wildflowers will soon be planted, and some trails and signage will be put in.

“The intention is to have this as an outdoor education site for local schools and the public,” McKay said.

Those wishing to get involved in the project, either by volunteering or donation, can contact the Dunnville Horticultural Society.

A bit of warm weather does not make it gardening season

Marlene Link cautions against being too eager in the garden

“Haste makes waste” is a saying that can apply to our gardens, too — don’t be too hasty at the first warm day to start clearing your gardens.

Leave your leaves to help insulate your plants and bulbs, as we are likely to receive more wintry weather. It also protects the worms that are breaking those leaves down and fertilizing the soil.

If you really must do some work, start by removing broken branches, dead hosta leaves and damaged plants; you can also cut back tall flower stems.

Add this material to your compost, with some manure to give it a kick-start. Try to avoid walking on your beds, as this compacts the soil, which makes it hard for roots to grow.

Pruning late summer-blooming plants can be done now, but don’t prune spring blooming plants now — wait until after they have bloomed to prune or shape.

Cut back your ornamental grasses, and if you have large-stemmed grass, save those stems to use for supports. Leave your silver leafed plants, like lavender, caryopteris and artemisia for a later date and warmer weather.

Why not join other gardeners and would-be gardeners at our next program night on April 18? It’s movie night for the Dunnville Horticultural Society.

We will be screening the documentary film The Gardener, which chronicles one man’s pursuit of gardening perfection during his 60-year love affair with his 20-acre garden.

We meet every third Thursday at the Optimist Club Hall, 101 Main St., from 7 to 9 p.m. Or visit us online on Facebook or at www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org.

For questions or comments, president contact Deb Zynomirski at 416-566-9337 or debzyn@gmail.com.

– Marlene Link is a member of the Dunnville Horticultural Society.

Plants aren’t always thrilled with Winter Weather either

Do you dislike winter weather? Do you hate the cold that gives us the shivers, or the snow that makes driving conditions unbearable at times?

Well, our plants are not always thrilled about winter either, especially the ice and fluctuating temperatures we see as spring approaches.

The changing temperatures makes one wonder how plants can survive -33 C yet be damaged by -3 C a few months later.

It all has to do with fluctuating hardiness. Plants produce their own antifreeze, but they reach maximum hardiness in January and February. As the temperatures rise, the plants start to de-harden, and therefore when the temperatures drop again, they may suffer freeze injuries.

Damage usually shows up later in the spring. Never try to remove built up ice and snow, as this will cause more damage to your plants. Simply let it melt naturally and your trees, shrubs and plants will return to their normal forms.

Prune any broken branches as soon as possible, as clean cuts heal quicker than a ragged break. Also, be aware of using de-icers like salt near your trees and shrubs.

To avoid freeze injury, know your planting zone and select plants that are hardy in your location.

Of course, a certain rodent (not mentioning any names) has predicted an early spring, so maybe we will be safe from freeze injuries this year.

Why not join other gardeners and would-be gardeners at our next program night on March 21? Our speakers Troy Moodie, Kelly Bowers and Natalie Hahn will discuss the importance of bees.

The Dunnville Horticultural Society meets every third Thursday at the Optimist Club Hall, 101 Main St. from 7 to 9 p.m.

Visit us online on our Facebook page or website, www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org

For questions or comments, contact president Deb Zynomirski at 416-566-9337 or debzyn@gmail.com.

– Marlene Link is a member of the Dunnville Horticultural Society.

Waxing Poetic Over Snowdrops

Columnist Marlene Link sings the praises of the little white flowers
Snowdrops will be popping up in gardens soon. – Cathie Coward

Oh Spring! Wherefore art thou? Which do I long for more? Watching for the first Snowdrops to appear, or getting my hands in the soil? Methinks I’ll watch for the Snowdrops as the ground is likely too cold to dig.

There are 20 varieties of Snowdrops but three are the most common: single white common, double, and a very early large variety. All three varieties have three slender leaves. Snowdrops propagate quickly and produce tiny bulblets. When planting in the fall, add compost, leaf mould or well rotted manure. In addition, they like a little moisture. I also enjoy Winter Aconites (Eranthis) which are a small yellow flower with green ruff.

Snowdrops can be found in literature and art as a sign of spring…let’s hope we start to see their beautiful faces soon!

Why not join other gardeners and would-be gardeners at our next Program Night on March 21? Our speakers will be Troy Moodie, Kelly Bowers and Natalie Hahn on “All About the Bees!” The Dunnville Horticultural Society meets every third Thursday at the Optimist Club Hall, 101 Main St. From 7-9pm. Or visit us online at our Facebook page or website www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org For questions or comments, contact Deb Zynomirski (President) at (416) 566-9337 or debzyn@gmail.com.

 

– Marlene Link is a member of the Dunnville Horticultural Society.
Canadian Shield Rose

A Rose By Any Other Name

A rose by any other name …
Marlene Link shares some information about a new variety of rose, the Canadian Shield

OPINION Feb 12, 2019 by Marlene Link The Sachem

Lots of people give and receive roses around Valentine’s Day. – Metroland file photo

February is heart month with Valentine’s Day to express our love. Lots of people will send or receive roses. On that note, it brings my attention to what is new in roses.

The Canadian Shield rose is the first variety released by the Vineland Research and Innovation Centre.

Canadian Shield is cold hardy, disease resistant and low maintenance. It is also tolerant of black spot and powdery mildew. It is a large bush, covered with vibrant full red flowers and dark green glossy leaves.

It blooms and repeats from July to October, zoned 2B. It is also self-cleaning, meaning the petals fall off, which eliminates pruning and dead-heading. This rose sounds like a dream for all rose lovers!

Why not join other gardeners and would-be gardeners at our next program night on February 21?

Our speaker will be Dr. Janice Gilbert, who will present on invasive phragmites.

The Dunnville Horticultural Society meets every third Thursday at the Optimist Club Hall, 101 Main St., from 7 9 p.m.

You can also visit us online on our Facebook page or at www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org

For questions or comments, contact president Deb Zynomirski at 416-566-9337 or debzyn@gmail.com.

Marlene Link is a member of the Dunnville Horticultural Society.

“Autumn…the year’s last, loveliest smile.”

Sandi Marr

“Autumn…the year’s last, loveliest smile.” [Indian Summer]” ― John Howard Bryant 

As summer winds down to fall, it’s time to think about autumn gardening tasks. If your summer containers are as bedraggled as some of mine, replant for fall. Garden centre shelves are full of colourful mums, pansies, asters, ornamental peppers, grasses, cabbage and kale.

You can even use fall blooming perennials such as sedums, for extra interest! Plant containers tightly so you have a good show right through to Thanksgiving!

When fall frost hits the annuals or if they look poor already, you can clean them out of beds and fill your compost pile. Water trees and shrubs less, allowing them to harden off before winter sets in.

Fall is the best time to get your lawn ready for next spring. Cooler night time temperatures, warm days and ample moisture make this the ideal time to get new grass seeds growing so your lawn can look its best next year.  


After soil temperature drops below 60° in the fall months, plant
spring flowering bulbs of Tulips, Daffodils, Hyacinths, Dwarf Irises, Anemone, and Crocus. Select healthy, disease free bulbs. Add Bone meal or Bulb fertilizer into the planting hole as you prepare the soil.

Tender bulbs like Dahlias should be dug up and stored in a cool, dark area after first frost.

     For more excellent gardening tips, visit our website www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org and Facebook page. Better yet, join us Sept. 20, 7-9pm for our Dunnville Horticultural Society (DHS) Monthly Program at the Optimist Hall. Doors open at 6:30pm. Our program nights are free and open to everyone, members and non-members alike. Join us for friendship, refreshments, Jr Gardener’s Flower and Vegetable Show and Awards Night. Hear an informative Speaker, Adrianne Lickers of Six Nations Market & Garden Coordinator. Topic: Sweet Grasses Gardening (history, basketry, craft and medicinal uses).

 

For more information, contact Debbie Thomas, President at (905) 774-3064.

Written by Sandi Marr, DHS member.  Photo by Sandi Marr.

 

 

 

 

Healthy Hanging Baskets All Summer Long

Sandi Marr

 

By July, our hanging baskets start looking tired. Here are a few tips to rejuvenate them for the rest of the summer.

Prune. Often the centre of a hanging basket begins to die out. Redirect growth to the top of your hanging basket by pruning. Trim about one third of the growth on the sides of your hanging basket to encourage growth in the centre. Be sure to regularly deadhead spent flowers.

Water thoroughly. A good rule of thumb is to water until water runs out the bottom of the container. It is best to water in the morning or evening (or both, in extreme heat).

Fertilize. High phosphorus (the middle number) keeps flowers blooming.

Rotate. Often hanging baskets are hung on a porch or other place where they are exposed to sunlight on only one side. In that care, it is important to rotate the baskets for even growth.

Plan ahead. When you purchase a hanging basket in May or June, be sure to look for a 12 or 14 inch pot size. A 10 inch basket will dry out too quickly. If you purchase a 10 inch pot, transplant it into a 12 or 14 inch size for best results.

As your hanging baskets continue to bloom and look their best, enjoy these warm summer months. After all, we deserve some hot days after our long Canadian winters

Visit our Facebook page and website at: www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org. For questions or comments, contact Debbie Thomas, President (905) 774-3064 debbie.j.thomas@gmail.com or Vice-President Deb Zynomirski (416) 556-9337 debzyn@gmail.com. We resume our monthly program nights in September. Stay safe and happy gardening.

-by Sandi Marr, DHS member

 

 

 

 

Gardening Tasks for May

Sandi Marr

 

We’d all agree. Spring has been a long time coming. But it feels like it is finally here. Let’s begin our gardening!

Rake up winter debris from flowerbeds. Break off wilting tulip or daffodil heads and allow the foliage to die back naturally.

Lightly side dress perennials with an all-purpose fertilizer. Avoid spilling the fertilizer on the plant, and use care not to damage the shallow roots when you cultivate it into the soil. Spring is a good time to divide perennials.

Prune back early flowering shrubs such as forsythias, weigela and spirea by one third when they have finished blooming.

Remove the wilting seed heads from rhododendrons and azaleas so that the plants’ energy
can go to foliage growth and next year’s flowers, rather than seeds.

Lilacs should be fertilized (10-10-10) and pruned after they finish blooming, removing sucker growths and dead blooms.

Roses, deciduous shrubs and trees may be fertilized (10-10-10). Be sure to water the fertilizer in thoroughly after it is applied. Keep an eye on the roses, spraying for aphids and other diseases such as black spot.

Remove any sucker growths from fruit trees. Cut out all the dead canes from your raspberry patch. The new canes that will bear this year’s fruit should have new, swollen buds along the edges. Thin these to five canes per foot of row to allow good air circulation and prevent overcrowding.

May is a perfect month to repair your lawn. Visit your local garden centre for a good quality lawn care seed and fertilizer.

You won’t want to miss our Annual Plant Sale 7am-noon, Sat. May 12, rain or shine at its new location 210 Main St E (bridge parking lot overlooking the river). Rise early to get great deals on annuals, perennials, as well as unique garden accents and fresh cut flowers for Mother’s Day. Memberships will be available for purchase. All proceeds dedicated to the beatification of Dunnville.

For more gardening tips, join us at the Optimist Hall, 7-9pm on May17 for ““Weeds: Good vs. Bad/Which Weeds are Which?” Speaker: Carla Carlson, Niagara Nature Tours. There will also be an Annual Rose Draw for Members.

 

Doors open at 6:30 pm.  Refreshments are served and the evening is free to members and non-members. Visit our Facebook page and website at: www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org. Contact Debbie Thomas, President (905) 774-3064 debbie.j.thomas@gmail.com or Vice-President Deb Zynomirski (416) 556-9337 debzyn@gmail.com.