Dunnville Horticulture Society

New storyboard commemorates Dunnville’s Floral Clock

by Tamara Botting: The Sachem

 

Dunnville Horticultural Society project receives Community Project Award

The Dunnville Horticultural Society is continuing its efforts to beautify the community.

The group’s most recent project was the installment of a storyboard to commemorate Dunnville’s floral clock.

The clock, located at Main Street and the bridge, was built in 1957.

“The clock had not kept time since 2013. The internal workings were removed and inspected as to repairs. It was deemed replacement was the only option,” said Deb Zynomirski, president of the horticultural society.

“Following years of community consultation as to (whether we should) replace, repair, refurbish or even remove (the clock) altogether, Dunnville Horticultural Society decided to repurpose the original stone base.”

With a community partnership program grant from Haldimand County, a storyboard was recently installed to detail “the history of the popular downtown fixture, while honouring the commitment of those residents and groups that originally installed and cared for it over the decades,” Zynomirski said.

The project was selected for the Community Project Award (under $10,000) at Haldimand’s Recognition Night on Oct. 17. The other entry in the category was the hort society’s designation of a heritage tree in the Thompson Creek Eco Centre.

Dunnville’s Floral Clock

Dunnville's Floral Clock

“New storyboard commemorates Dunnville’s Floral Clock.  Built in 1957, the Clock had not kept time since 2013. The internal workings were removed and inspected as to repairs. It was deemed replacement was the only option.

Following years of community consultation as to replace, repair, refurbish or even remove altogether, Dunnville Horticultural Society decided to repurpose the original stone base.
With the assistance of a Community Partnership Program grant from Haldimand County, the new facade reflects the history of the popular downtown fixture, while honouring the commitment of those residents and groups that originally installed and cared for it over the decades.”

It’s Harvest Time

Houston harvests a zucchini

An earlier Haldimand Press article (July 11, 2019) suggested growing zucchini was a good way to introduce children to gardening.

One day before Houston McGowan turned two years of age, he picked this last-of-the season zucchini from the Lowbanks’ garden along Lake Erie. It weighed nearly 3 kg and measured 41 cm in length.

For tasty frying, it’s better to harvest zucchini before they reach this size, however by grinding up this one, his mother Maggie can make a winters supply of relish!

At Houston’s young age, the photo certainly shows the interest and enjoyment children can experience in Haldimand gardening!

Called Raven, this is an especially good zucchini variety as it produces abundantly from late June into October, benefiting by the lake moderating the temperature and prolonging the growing season. In addition, the plant was watered and fed regularly with 10-52-10 fertilizer throughout the season.

Because Raven is a hybrid, Houston will not save the seed from this giant. New seed will be purchased next year.

Lester C. Fretz, M.Sc., is a Dunnville Horticulture Society member and Haldimand gardener.

Don’t Blame the goldenrod

A bumble bee on Canadian Goldenrod making his rounds collecting pollen from the flowers. - Staff photo/IAN KELSO
Columnist Marlene Link asks what plant is the real culprit.

Is goldenrod taking a bad rap for your sneezing? Or is the real culprit ragweed?

Found growing side by side, goldenrod is unfairly blamed for most pollen allergens coming from ragweed.

Ragweed is an annual broadleaf weed with ragged looking leaves that resemble the artemisia plant.

Ragweed’s pollen is spread by the wind, whereas goldenrod is pollinated by pollinators like bees and butterflies. Goldenrod has bright yellow flower clusters and ragweed has a greenish-yellow spiked flower.

Goldenrod and ragweed are two different species and do not share the same genus or tribe.

So when goldenrod is in bloom, remember it’s the ragweed pollen blowing in the wind that is making you sneeze. Now you can enjoy the fall colour of goldenrod in your garden and help the pollinators store up food for winter.

Why not join other happy gardeners and would-be gardeners at our next Program Night, Thursday, Oct. 17? Our featured speaker is Raj Gill of Lake Erie Alive, speaking on the current state of health of Lake Erie, and how we can protect it.

The Dunnville Hort Society meets every third Thursday at the Optimist Club Hall, 101 Main St. from 7 to 9 p.m. Or visit us online at our Facebook page or website www.dunnvillehortandgardenclub.org For questions or comments, contact Deb Zynomirski (president) at 416-566-9337 or debzyn@gmail.com.

Marlene Link is a member of the Dunnville Horticultural Society.

DHS hosts Fall Forum

Shown (l-r) is Thomas, Zynormirski, Hewitt, and Tanazi. Above right are some of the creative decorations at the meeting. —Haldimand Press photos by Valerie Posthumus.

DUNNVILLE—The Dunnville Horticultural Society (DHS) held the District 9 Fall Forum on Saturday, September 28, 2019 at their home base: the Optimist Hall. There were 57 members in attendance from Horticultural societies across Niagara and Haldimand.

“It was a great day for DHS!” said Deb Zynomirski, President. “Everyone enjoyed the decor in the hall, great food, prizes, and the speaker.”

Debbie Thomas, Past President, was awarded the District Service Award from Margaret Tanazi, District 9 Director.

Haldimand Mayor Ken Hewitt expressed “appreciation for all that the Dunnville Horticultural Society does to enhance and beautify the town of Dunnville.”

Councillor Bernie Corbett also stopped by with greetings. Corbett listed the many accomplishments of DHS, especially the recent revitalization and opening of the Thompson Creek Park Eco Centre. The past year was very successful for the society. Among plant sales, planting days, and garden tours, they host meetings on the third Thursday of every month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Optimist Hall.

For information about events or membership contact Zynomirski at debzyn@gmail.com.

Getting a Spring & Fall Crop

Egyptian onion, also called tree, top setting, and walking onions are unique in different ways. They grow a cluster of bulblets where most onions have a flower. These sets can be planted in the fall for very early spring green onions.

After the bulblets, as shown in the first photo, have matured and its stem has become dry and brittle, by cutting the stem off at ground level in late summer, a second crop of green onions will grow up from the parent bulb in the fall. The second photo taken in September shows this tasty fall crop.

Egyptian onions tend to be much stronger than other bunching onions, but for someone who relishes that taste and enjoys having an abundance to eat, they can be enjoyed as early as the spring and again in the fall.

While enjoying the green onions in the fall, the sets harvested earlier can be planted at the same time. They should be planted in good soil about 2 cm deep and 15 cm apart. They will be the earliest green onions to mature.

It is very obvious that Egyptian onions propagate and multiply profusely. They will even self-propagate if the gardener fails to harvest the bulblets, as they will mature, fall to the ground, and begin to grow the following year’s crop.

Lester C. Fretz, M.Sc., is a member of the Dunnville Horticulture Society.